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National Theatre Project featured on Divisare



Lovely to see my National Theatre photographs from my ongoing Beautiful Brutalism project featured on Divisare's January 17th journal and also featured in their Concrete Expressions collection.

Divisare is a wonderful collection of architecture from all over the world with a focus on architectural photography and well worth checking out.

The whole project on Divisare can be seen here.

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To view the whole project please visit structuraleye.

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To view the rest of the images from this project please visit - structraleye