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Jennifer Lee : the potter's space at Kettle's Yard, Cambridge




I recently photographed the beautiful new exhibition by ceramicist Jennifer Lee at Kettle's Yard, Cambridge. It is her first UK show since 1994 and it shows work spanning 40 years. The exhibition was designed by Jamie Fobert Architects and after several visits to Lee's studio they decided the space of the studio should also be shown in the exhibition. They decided a single surface the exact height of Jennifer's workbench would be 'a powerful yet minimal response.'

To learn more about the inspiration behind the design of the exhibition please visit Jamie Fobert's website.


To view the whole project please visit my website.

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